'Sad' history lesson

EDUCATION: Emily Steains, left, and Natasha Vellacott inspect an exhibit.

EDUCATION: Emily Steains, left, and Natasha Vellacott inspect an exhibit.

BEING informed about the unprecedented scale of casualties in World War One was one of the key lessons for a group of school students attending the Australia Will Be There exhibition.

There were more than 38 million casualties, making it one of the deadliest conflicts in human history.

There were over 17 million deaths and 20 million wounded. Australia has a population of just five million when war was declared. Our casualties totalled over 62,000.

"I didn't know that there that many casualties," Emily McDonald said.

She was part of a group of Year 10 history students from Kerang Christian College who visited the exhibition in the closing days of its showing in Kerang.

"There were too many," she said.

Natasha Vellacott described the toll as "really sad."

Emily Steains was intrigued by the number and variety of battles, the support work of the people back home and the role of nurses.

Elizabeth Edgley said that she had read some information about the war.

"I didn't realise a lot of that happened. It's really sad," she said.

More than 400 people inspected the exhibition during its 20 sessions at Kerang.

Smartphone
Tablet - Narrow
Tablet - Wide
Desktop