Taste for care plans

PLANNING: Betty Jobling, left, with Kerang District Health quality co-ordinator, Karen Transton discuss advanced care planning.

PLANNING: Betty Jobling, left, with Kerang District Health quality co-ordinator, Karen Transton discuss advanced care planning.

SCONES and tea provided an added incentive this week for district people to consider their end-of-life wishes.

Kerang District Health used its Rita Hall Opportunity Shop for an advanced care planning 'Scones and Sign-on' day, which aimed to encourage people to have those difficult conversations with loved ones about what plans must be made to handle their lifestyle wishes before they die.

Kerang District Health quality co-ordinator, Karen Transton said that advanced care planning was important for people to make decisions about their own wishes so that decisions can be made when the person can no longer make decisions themselves.

District services nurse unit manager, Sue Gray said that we often think our children know what we will want but in times of crisis it can place an enormous amount of stress on them to have to work it out.

"It is a difficult conversation for family to have and we want to encourage people to talk about it," Mrs Gray said. 

The day itself was bright and cheery as people wandered in to have a scone and a chat with hospital staff, and pick up an information pack.

The health service's auxiliary president, Wilma Ellis said it was a "touchy subject", but hosting it in the op-shop and having the scones helped to bring people out to have those necessary conversations.

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