Over the next five weeks, the doors to the Riverside Park sports stadium will be open to anyone of all abilities to try their hand at basketball.

BEING ACTIVE: Kerang Amateur Basketball Association trainer Paula Ellis, back right, Basketball Victoria trainer Megan Moody, second right, with participants for this week's basketball training for all abilities.

BEING ACTIVE: Kerang Amateur Basketball Association trainer Paula Ellis, back right, Basketball Victoria trainer Megan Moody, second right, with participants for this week's basketball training for all abilities.

ASH JAMES

Over the next five weeks, the doors to the Riverside Park sports stadium will be open to anyone of all abilities to try their hand at basketball.

Participants will be under the guidance of international basketballer, Megan Moody in a program backed by Kerang Amateur Basketball Association, Basketball Victoria, the Navigator Program and disability support organisation Vivid.

The community Access for all Abilities initiative started this week. 

Anyone can come for free to have a chat with professional basketball and BAV coach Megan Moody. 

The program, funded by the Department of Health and Human Services, is being conducted under the auspices of Mallee Sports Assembly project officer, Rhonda Allan.

Megan Moody this week introduced dribbling techniques and the art of shooting the hoop. 

She played three games with the Houston Comets and did stints with Fenerbache in Istanbul, Turkey, Great Britain's national team, the Riberia team in Italy and closer to home with Dandenong Rangers; Bendigo Spirit and the Bendigo Lady Braves. 

Once a week, Ms Moody will be at the sports stadium to teach the game to anyone interested in basketball. She said she was impressed by the efforts of the organisers. 

"It's just fantastic to see these organisations working together provide an opportunity for people to try something new and worthwhile. 

"Someone with a visual impairment was dribbling the ball and getting ready to shoot for the hoop."

Vivid support worker, John Quinn said events like these are delightful.

"It's about getting these people out in the area and mixing with with the community and enjoying themselves," he said. 

"We've done tennis, bowls, carpet bowls... it makes everyone feel good, seeing them socialise with others..." 

Navigator program officer Sue Lacey said the program allows socially marginalised members of the community to be out and about. 

"It's about trying to get them to participate in life, be physically active, and it's a chance to boost their confidence."

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